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2 posts from June 2015

06/24/2015

"The Medical Industrial Complex": A Conversation with Rosemary Gibson (June 24th)

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With the health care industry now accounting for 18.5 percent of the nation's GDP, or a far greater percentage than any comparable nation, combined with ever continuing access, coverage (now possibly moreover the issue of under-insurance) and quality (including the frequency of patient or iatrogenic harm) health care policy students are left to wonder to what extent has health care delivery or legitimate health care delivery been compromised or even undermined by medical commerce.    

During this 27 minute conversation Ms. Gibson explains what's meant by the Eisenhower-inspired "medical industrial complex" and her use of the phrase "privatized gains and socialized losses" in this context.  She discusses the unwarranted influence of the health care industry in part by noting pharmaceutical industry behavior and the advent of so called "consumer directed health plans.  Ms. Gibson also evaluates to what extent the ACA will strike a better balance between health care and medical commerce or again the "medical industrial complex."  

Ms. Rosemary Gibson is a Senior Advisor at the non-profit Hasting Center, a research organization dedicated to addressing ethical issues in health, medicine and the environment.  Ms. Gibson is also Rosemary_gibson[1]an editor of JAMA Internal Medicine.  Previously, Ms. Gibson was a Program Officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation where she addressed safety and quality issues particularly in palliative care.  Among other books Ms. Gibson is the author of Wall of Silence, The Untold Story of the Medical Mistakes That Kill and Injure Millions of Americans.  Ms. Gibson serves on numerous boards including the Consumers Union Safe Project and among others she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.  Ms. Gibson is a graduate of Georgetown University and the London School of Economics.

Information on Rosemary Gibson's book, noted during this interview (and coauthored by Janardan Prasad), The Battle Over Health Care, can be found at: http://www.amazon.com/The-Battle-Over-Health-Care/dp/144221449X

 

06/16/2015

The Re-emergence of Community Health Workers & Peer Support: A Conversation with Ed Fisher (June 15th)

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The use of community health workers (CHW) dates back to the 1800s.  The impetus for these workers today is to provide peer support largely in poor or under-served communities since these communities typically suffer disparities in health care access, in the quality of health care delivery and consequently experience higher morbidity and mortality rates.  The ACA via the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation is supporting CHW demonstration projects, states are testing their use via Medicaid programming and various providers are using CHW to improve self management support among high health care service utilizers.   

During this 20 minute conversation, Dr. Fisher discusses the reasons why the use of CHW is increasing, who they are and how they're trained, in what provider setting they work, their level of success, how they're accepted by clinicians and patients and how their services are reimbursed.      

Dr. Edwin Fisher is a University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health Professor and HB-fisher_ed_2013serves as Global Director for the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation's Peers for Progress program.  Peers for Progress promotes peer support in health, health care and prevention around the world.  From 2002 to 2009 Dr. Fisher served as National Program Director for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Diabetes Initiative.  Dr. Fisher has published widely in prevention, chronic disease management and quality of life addressing asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, smoking and weight management.  He is past-president of the Society of Behavioral Medicine and has served as a board member for the International Society of Behavioral Medicine and the American Lung Association.  He was graduated from the SUNY, Stony Brook with a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.       

Information on Peers for Progress is at: peersforprogress.org