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2 posts from July 2015

07/24/2015

Tracking Implantable Medical Devices with a UDI: A Conversation with Ben Moscovitch (July 31st)

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For the past eight years the federal government has been working to create a unique medical device identification (UDI) number that would identify a medical device's manufacturer, the device's make and model, its expiration date and other information for the purposes of improving or ensuring patient safety and product improvement.   While progress has been made in establishing a UDI tracking system, we have still not implemented the use of UDIs in medical claims forms and in electronic health records (EHRs).  A UDI is particularly important since it would allow health care providers, researchers and others to track particularly implantable medical devices.   For example, annually over one million Americans receive an artificial hip or knee.  These devices can and do fail and can cause serious cognitive and neurological impairment, bone deterioration and in severe cases, amputation.  

During this 19 minute conversation Mr. Ben Moscovitch discusses the development of a UDI over the past eight years, current efforts to include a UDI data field on the medical claims form and in EHRs, why UDI adoption has not, or still not, been achieved and chances it will be achieved.    

As Officer of The Pew Charitable Trust's medical devices project, Ben Moscovitch works on federal BenMoscovitchinitiatives to enhance the data available on product performance to support medical device innovation and quality improvement.   Prior to joining Pew, Mr. Moscovitch worked on public policy communications at the National Association of Chain Drug Stores and was previously a journalist covering medical product regulation and legislation.   Mr. Moscovitch received his Master of Arts degreee from Tel Aviv University and his Bachelor's from Georgetown University.

For more on Pew's work regarding medical devices see: http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/search#q=medical%20devices.

 

 

07/15/2015

"Person-Centered" Health Analytics: A Conversation with Dwight McNeill (July 14th)

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Health care analytics has typically referred to modeling insurer or payer risk or to predict patient utilization or to segment patient populations.  However, because of advances in personal or wearable medical devices, supporting software applications and the increasing use of electronic health records, individuals or patients now have the opportunity to gather their own health and medical data and information and use it to better manage their health status and/or medical needs.  This opportunity is what's become termed the democratization of health care or alternatively the emancipation of the patient.  

During this 25 minute conversation Dr. Dwight McNeill provides an overview of his recently published work, "Using Person-Centered Health Analytics to Live Longer," i.e., he unpacks four domains he identifies ("knowing me," "protecting health," "minding illness," and "managing data") that can empower, enable and equip an individual to manage their health and medical needs.  Dwight also discusses barriers to the adoption to "person-centered" analytics  and near future potential of these tools.          

Dr. Dwight McNeill is Lead Faculty for the International Institute for Analytics.  He is also President of WayPoint Health Analytics which provides consultation to organizations on health and McNeillhealthcare analytics.  During his 30-year career, he has worked in corporate settings, most recently as global leader for business analytics and optimization for the healthcare industry for IBM and previously as director of healthcare information at GTE Corporation (Verizon).  Earlier, Dwight worked for the federal Department of Health and Human Services and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, for information companies, and in provider settings.  Dwight has published two related books on healthcare analytics in 2013: A Framework for Applying Analytics in Healthcare: What Can Be Learned from the Best Practices in Retail, Banking, Politics, and Sports; and, Analytics in Healthcare and the Life Sciences: Strategies, Implementation Methods, and Best Practices.   He has also published frequently in Health Affairs and other related journals. Dwight earned his PhD from Brandeis University in Health and Social Policy and his MPH degree from Yale University in Public Health and Epidemiology.  

For more on "Using Person-Centered Health Analytics to Live Longer" see: http://www.amazon.com/Dwight-McNeill/e/B00DC26RXW