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05/01/2015

The State of Alzheimer's Funding and Research: A Conversation with Robert Egge (April 30th)

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Alzheimer's Disease accounts for approximately 70% of all dementia diagnoses.  The disease affects over five million Americans or upwards of 35 million worldwide.  Disease burden is currently estimated to grow to 16 million patients in the US by 2050 with projected costs estimated at over $1 trillion.  Patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's survive three to nine years. The disease kills 500,000 deaths annually, making it the 6th leading cause of death.  The risk of the disease is believed to be largely genetic.  There are currently no treatments or medications to stop, reverse or modify its progression - the only major disease with this distinction.  

During this 23 minute discussion Mr. Egge discusses the work of the Alzheimer's Association, the current state of curative research and the development of a blood test to diagnose Alzheimer's before symptoms appear, the adequacy of federal funding to fight the disease, the federally-legislated "National Alzheimer's Plan" and what's being done to improve care for patients currently suffering from Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia.   

Robert Egge is the Chief Public Policy Officer and Executive Vice President of Government Affairs Eggefor the Alzheimer's Association.  Mr. Egge also serves as the Executive Director of the Alzheimer's Association's sister organization, the Alzheimer's Impact Movement.  Prior to joining the Alzheimer's Association Mr. Egge served as Executive Director of the Alzheimer's Study Group.  Prior still he served as a Project Director for the Center for Health Transformation and as Vice President for Government Affairs for the JC Watts Companies.  Mr. Egge's writings have appeared in The New York Times, the Financial Times, in Health Affairs and he has provided testimony to both US House and Senate health care committees.

For more on the work of the Alzheimer's Association go to: www.alz.org.

 

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